Sunday, January 15, 2017

112. Philippine JETONS



Jetons were coin-like medals produced across Europe from the 13th through the 17th centuries. They were produced as counters for use in calculation on a lined board similar to an abacus. They also found use as a money substitute in games, similar to modern casino chips or poker chips.

In Europe during the Middle ages they produced jetons for use in games and toys, sometimes copying more or less famous jetons with a political background.

There is a fine line difference between jeton and token.  In the Philippines these jetons were used to promote certain events like Manila Carnival.  An example is the 1927 Queen Luisa with  "Miss Philippine" on the reverse.  Another is the 1926 La Bella with "Islas Filipinas" inside a wreath.  These jetons are made of brass.

Sample of Indian Head CALIFORNIA GOLD TOKEN
and Indian Head FILIPINO GOLD JETON
Some were patterned after the California US gold tokens with bust of Lady Liberty or  American Indian on the obverse, and “FILIPINO GOLD” on the reverse.  There were even designs resembling the Spanish Philippine Isabel II gold coins from the 1860s like the "Reina De Las Joyas, Filipinas". These thin jetons were usually made of 10K gold, measuring 16-21 mm in diameter. 

They were also used to advertise establishments like the La Perla de Oriente and other jewelry stores.  

A good reference is the "Coins, Medals and Tokens of the Philippines 1728-1974" by Aldo Basso and "Philippine Medals and Tokens 1780-2010"  by Earl D. Honeycutt, Ph.D.

These jetons are small souvenir coins or token for whatever purpose they were used they have become a popular numismatic item.   

  SOME SAMPLES OF PHILIPPINE JETONS

OBVERSE
   
REVERSE

MELVIN LAM Collection

MELVIN LAM Collection




Source: Wikipedia






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