Monday, November 25, 2013

93. RECUERDO DE PATAY, Pinoy Photos of the Dead



There is always a feeling of uneasiness, whenever we look at these photos. Looking at them sends cold chills down our spine.  We shy away from this type of photos thinking that these are morbid reminder of the dead and they might wake up to haunt us.

I do not really like collecting these photos but I am keeping them to remind us of the past. It reminds us that we should honor and remember our dearly departed thought these photograph mementos.  


Recuerdos de Patay of a wealthy mid aged woman. Ca. 1920's

Recuerdo de Patay  (also known as memorial portraiture, memento mori, post-mortem photography or mourning portraits) is the practice of photographing the recently deceased.

The invention of the photography made portraiture a commonplace, as many of those who were unable to afford the commission of a painted portrait could afford to sit for a photography session. This cheaper and quicker method also provided the middle class with a means for memorializing dead loved ones.

With the coming of the Americans at the turn of the century they introduced to us the  post-mortem photography

Postcard of a dead Baby being serenaded. Ca. 1910's


This type photography was very common in the nineteenth century when "death occurred in the home and was quite an ordinary part of life." Due to photography being a new medium, it is plausible that "many post-mortem portraits, especially those of infants and young children, were probably the only photographs ever made of the 'sitters.'" Post-mortem photography flourished in photography's early decades, among clients who preferred to capture an image of a deceased loved one rather than have no photograph at all."


Recuerdos de Patay of a young boy. Ca. 1920's

These photographs served as keepsakes to remember the deceased. This was especially common with infants and young children; early childhood mortality rates were extremely high, and a post-mortem photograph might have been the only image of the child the family ever had. The later invention of the carte de visite, which allowed multiple prints to be made from a single negative, meant that copies of the image could be mailed to relatives.

The practice eventually peaked in popularity around the end of the 19th century and died out as "snapshot" photography became more commonplace.

Filomena Almarines . The Dead and the Living, Aug 13-38 - July 6-13.  Taken by Ledesma Studio. Binan, Laguna.  For more information view And All The Angels and Saints site

The earliest post-mortem photographs are usually close-ups of the face or shots of the full body and rarely include the coffin. The subject is usually depicted so as to seem in a deep sleep, or else arranged to appear more lifelike. Children were often shown in repose on a couch or in a crib, sometimes posed with a favorite toy or other plaything. It was not uncommon to photograph very young children with a family member, most frequently the mother. Adults were more commonly posed in chairs or even braced on specially-designed frames. Flowers were also a common prop in post-mortem photography of all types.

Post-mortem photo of an old woman. Circa 1918


Post-mortem photography is still practiced in some areas of the world, such as Eastern Europe. Photographs, especially depicting persons who were considered to be very holy lying in their coffins are still circulated among faithful Eastern Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox Christians.

As the common practice of post-mortem photography in North America and Western Europe has largely ceased, the portrayal of such images has become increasingly seen as vulgar, sensationalistic and taboo. This is in marked contrast to the beauty and sensitivity perceived in the older tradition, indicating a cultural shift that may reflect wider social discomfort with death. Notably, however, the photographs of a number of contemporary artists imply a dialogue that helps illuminate the intent of the early works.

Source: Wikipedia

Recuerdos de Patay. Ca. 1920's

Recuerdos de Patay of a grandma. Ca. 1910's

Recuerdos de Patay of a mid aged man. Ca. 1920's



Recuerdos de Patay of a grandma. Ca. 1940's



Recuerdos de Patay of a grandma. Ca. 1950's


Recuerdos de Patay of a baby. Ca. 1922


Recuerdos de Patay of a baby. Ca. 1930's

Recuerdos de Patay of an old Mom. Ca. 1920's

Recuerdos de Patay of a baby. Ca. 1929

Recuerdos de Patay of a family member. Ca. 1950's

Recuerdos de Patay of a child. Ca. 1930's






Tuesday, September 10, 2013

92. ISAAC PERAL, more than an old street in Manila. (Cigarette wrapper collection )



 ISAAC PERAL y Caballero
Source: naukas.com
ISAAC PERAL was an old street name in Ermita, Manila that was later changed to United Nations Avenue.  Little did I know that Isaac Peral was a Spanish scientist, inventor, and military man. He invented the submarine -- the first U-boat in naval history.

He was sent in mission to the Philippines in 1881, first as a geographer and later as an officer of a gunboat. During his stay in the Philippines, he received seven patents between 1887 and 1891 for his other inventions.

The PERAL was the first electric battery powered submarine built by Isaac Peral, for the Spanish Navy. The first fully capable military submarine was launched on September 8, 1888. It had two torpedoes, new air systems, hull shape and propeller and cruciform external controls anticipating later designs. When fully charged it was the fastest submarine yet built, with performance levels that matched or exceeded those of First World War U-boats. In June 1890 Peral's submarine launched a torpedo under the sea. It was also the first submarine to incorporate a fully reliable underwater navigation system.

PERAL the first electric battery powered submarine
Source: www.clubdelamar
However, conservatives in the Spanish naval hierarchy terminated the project despite two years of successful tests. It is assumed that political reasons were the cause of its rejection after successful tests.  Isaac Peral, frustrated, retired from naval active duty in November 1891.











These Philippine cigarette wrappers are tribute to this great Spanish sailor, engineer and genius ISAAC PERAL


LA HOJA PURA Fabrica de Cigarros y Cigarrillos featuring ISAAC PERAL and the PERAL Submarine blowing up a ship

LA HOJA PURA Fabrica de Cigarros y Cigarrillos featuring ISAAC PERAL


LA CUBAN Fabrica de Cigarros y Cigarrillos de Pedro Roxas O. featuring the PERAL Submarine

Monochromatic cigarette wrapper of  LA HOJA PURA Fabrica de Cigarros y Cigarrillos featuring ISAAC PERAL and the PERAL Submarine



PAGKAKAISA Cigarrillos by Compania General De Tabacos De Filipinas  located at ISAAC PERAL No. 851 Manila

ULILA Cigarrillos by Compania General De Tabacos De Filipinas  located at ISAAC PERAL No. 851 Manila
LA ESCOLTA Cigarrillos by Compania General De Tabacos De Filipinas  located at ISAAC PERAL No. 851 Manila


Sources:
(1) senorenrique.blogspot.com
(2) Wikipedia

Monday, September 9, 2013

91. Philippine Postcards from the 1960's (Manila, Makati, & Caloocan)




MANILA BY NIGHT. Plaza Miranda, Rizal Avenue and Quezon Blvd. By KRUGER.

ESCOLTA at NIGHT. Multi colored neon lights up Manila's version of Fifth Avenue, New York. Banks and quality stores line up along the side. By Platischrome, National Book Store.


Legislative Building (Now National Museum). Manila Cityhall at the back. Made by KRUGER, National Bookstore.



Aerial View of Manila


National Library,  Manila

Busy Rizal Avenue (Avenida) at Night. Movie theaters along the avenue are the Ideal, State, Scala, Capitol, Ever, Avenue, Galaxy, and the Lyric.



China Town, Divisoria, Manila. Ca. 1960's
Quaipo Church, Manila. Ca. 1960's


Manila Hotel, taken from Manila bay.

Aerial view of Manila City. By Madonna Postcard. Ca. 1960's


ENTRANCE TO CHINESE GARDEN, RIZAL PARK. The ornate arch which is reminiscent of authentic Chinese Architecture least of the interior of the beautiful garden. By KRUGER, National Book Store.





THE CHILDREN'S PLAYGROUND, LUNETA. Located within the area of Rizal Park in Manila offers an endless variety of amusement for children. At the background are the Manila Hilton, the city's tallest building and some government and business establishments. Kruger by National Book Store

MINIATURE GARDEN, LUNETA. Cascading waterfalls & clear tiny lake , milti colored flowers, ever garden grass found in the junction of busy streets within Rizal Park area of Manila. By KRUGER, National Book Store.



MAPUA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY inside Intramuros. By KRUGER, National Book Store.


PASIG RIVER WITH MANILA'S SKYLINE - The Pasig river divides Manila into two parts, North and South. It has witnessed all of the changes that has come upon the nation's greatest city from the time of Legaspi, who founded the city to the establishment of the Republic. Plastichrome by National Book Store



Lourdes Church, Kanlaon St, Quezon City.

Bonifacio Monument in Caloocan.

ROXAS BLVD. Scenic view boulevard facing Manila Bay. By JMC Press, Inc.

HOTEL FILIPINAS, Paco, Manila.

THE MAKATI SHOPPING CENTER. This is part of Makati's development as an independent community with its own shopping center in the middle of office, industrial and residential buildings. By Plastichrome, National Book Store.



ANOTHER VIEW OF THE MAKATI SHOPPING CENTER. This commercial center caters to the needs of the residents of nearby San Lorenzo, Bel - Air, Urdaneta and Forbes Park. By Plastichrome, National Book Store.


MAKATI'S GROWING SKYLINE. In the few years , modern buildings have bee shooting up in this area. Makati's phenomenal growth may be credited to the far-reaching plans of its residents to ha a community comparable with any in the world. Plastichrome, National Book Store.

MAKATI SHOPPING CENTER. Building in front is Shoe Mart. Rizal theater at the back. Made by Kruger.

MANILA HILTON.  Postcard. Ca. 1960's

JONES BRIDGE and MAHILA SKYLINE. Postcard. Ca. 1960's

BLUMENTRITT - LIBERTAD JEEPNEY near Luneta. Postcard. Ca. 1960's

Aerial view of Port Area. Postcard. Ca. 1960's

CARRIEDO Area.  Postcard. Ca. 1960's

Aerial view of Luneta. Postcard. Ca. 1960's
Aerial view of Luneta Park. Postcard. Ca. 1960's
Luneta Park. Postcard. Ca. 1960's

Rizal Monument at Luneta Park. Postcard. Ca. 1960's

Landscape going to Lagusnilad, Manila. Ca. 1960's



Fort Santiago, Manila
Dewey Blvd., Manila

Legislative Building, Manila

Manila Chinese Cemetery, Philippines 1960s