Thursday, February 2, 2012

62. MALABON Stereographs during the Fil-American War


At the turn of the 20th century, Tinajeros, Malabon was a battleground between the Americans and Gen. Emilio Aguinaldo’s  forces.   This collection of stereographs clearly shows that Tinajeros, Malabon, was the site of several skirmishes between the American and Filipino forces in 1898-1899.

The stereograph, was the nineteenth-century predecessor of the Polaroid, with an imaginative flair. Placed on cardboard were two almost identical photographs, side by side, to be viewed with a stereoscope. When viewed through a stereoscope, the photograph appeared three-dimensional, an awe-inspiring illusion for anyone during that time.

In 1899, ten US regiments engaged Aguinaldo’s Force in Malabon. On March 25, 1899 the Americans advanced towards Malabon (near Caloocan). Describing their adventures in Malabon, Anthony Micheal of the Third Artillery wrote: "We bombarded a place called Malabon, and then we went in and killed every native we met, men, women, and children. It was a dreadful sight, the killing of the poor creatures. The natives captured some of the Americans and literally hacked them to pieces, so we got orders to spare no one."

The Americans suffered 16 casualties and 130 wounded;  and the Filipinos lost 125 men and 500 wounded.

A wall of Tinajeros pierced by a storm of American bullets, Philippine Islands
Copyright 1899 by Underwood & Underwood

Deserted Village of Tinajeros - scene of the hard fighting, Philippine Islands 
Copyright 1899 by Underwood & Underwood

Trenches deserted by Aguinaldo's Army, Malabon, Philippine Islands

A wall of Tinajeros pierced by a storm of American bullets, Philippine Islands
Copyright 1899 by Underwood & Underwood

On the Battlefield at Malabon, Philippine Islands
Copyright 1899 by Underwood & Underwood

Filipino Sharpshooters Perch in a tree- Tinajeros, Philippine Island
Copyright 1899 by Underwood & Underwood

The Utah Battery at Fort MacArthur shelling Malabon, P.I.

Filipino Prisoners captured by the Second Oregons near, Malabon, P.I.

Hotchkiss Quick Firing Gun shelling Insurrectos as they were leaving Malabon, March 26th, 1899

A short rest on the Fighting Line during the Battle at Malabon, P.I.
Copyright 1899 by Underwood & Underwood

A sacrifice to Aguinaldo's Ambition - Behind the Filipino Trenches after the Battle of Malabon, P.I.
Copyright 1899 by Underwood & Underwood

Sadness in Victory - our "Boys" caring for dying Insurgents - Battlefield of Malabon, P.I.
Copyright 1899 by Underwood & Underwood

Insurgents entrenchments across the road at Tinajeros, Philippine Islands
Copyright 1899 by Underwood & Underwood


A sacrifice to Aguinaldo's Ambition - Behind the Filipino Trenches after the Battle of Malabon, P.I.
Copyright 1899 by Underwood & Underwood

Wounded Filipino waiting for the American Ambulance, Malabon, P.I.


Filipino Prisoner at Malabon, P.I.


Source: 
"The Philippine-American War, 1899-1902," by Arnaldo Dumindin
Stereographs by the American Antiquarian Society

1 comment:

  1. no wonder that Malabon is one of the bulwark of Aglipayan church follower, just like other places where the revolutionaries were concentrated. But just didn't know that my hometown was steeply involved in the uprising against the colonizer; how come there is no historical landmark to commemorate the battle were we can all be proud of?

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